The “Every Man” But Not The “Crisis Man”

First, apologies to women. The title, written the “every man” could also be written the “every woman” too.

The term “every man” is meant to refer to someone who can do everything, sort of the go to person. So this person could certainly be a woman.

“Every Men” have become extremely popular in recent times. They are the person picked to lead (or at least represent) an organization,especially those which undergo extensive public scrutiny. The “everyman” protects the “board” or the “CEO” or in some case, the President of the US from embarrassment and distraction when something goes astray in the organization in question. Hmmm.

The “every man” can offer lucid testimony before Congress. He is relaxed and smooth with the press. Within government meetings, the “every man” is everyone’s ally and no ones enemy. The “every man” is just great to have around.

This apparently ideal situation often comes to an abrupt and sudden end. Crises demand a much different approach. Crises are fact driven and a few hurt feelings should be expected as normal operating conditions. Crises, as the name implies, are here and now events which only get worse unless corrective measures are taken. Hmmm.

The New York Times today reported that the President is seething over the number of times aids assured him that Ebola preparations were in place, only to find out they were not as advertised. Hmmm.

  • The “every man” assumes the best in others. The “crisis man” assumes the worst (or at least the high probability of human failure).
  • The “every man” expects subordinates to work harder and to be more vigilant simply because they should. The “crisis man” expects subordinates will assume the best when there is no proof.  Therefore the “crisis man” demands evidence.

Catching our breaths, we should recognize there should be no rational fear, in spite of performance to day, whether the US medical system can control Ebola. There should, however, have been a healthy amount of skepticism that the US medical system was ready in the early stages of confronting Ebola. Pandemics are not broken legs or hip replacements.

People do not walk around with signs on their chests proclaiming themselves as the “every man” or the “crisis man”. The leader must find them.

A great virtue of any leader is the ability to spot the every man and the crisis man. It is even a greater skill to know when to use each. (Crises are not normally obvious on day 1)

While President Obama has IMO performed credibly and at times heroically during his Presidency, his choice of subordinates has tended to be of the “every man” variety. Let’s hope that the next President can build upon President Obama’s high principles with a better knack of picking subordinates for the necessary task at hand.

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Explore posts in the same categories: Barack Obama, Ebola, leadership, management, Politics

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