Free Market Health Care

The Republican sponsored “American Health Care Act” is floundering in Congress. The replace portion (as in repeal and replace Obamacare) is in trouble for curious reasons given that Congress and the Presidency are both in Republican hands. The political farce which is unfolding casts a sharp light on the undeniable fact that there is no Republican Party united around a core set of principles. Rather today’s Republican Party is a party of convenience which unite around not being Democrat or progressive.

The shallowness of this union shows through in the Republican argument over repealing Obamacare and trying to agree upon a replacement. Maintaining “no pre-existing condition” or “no life time benefit limits” exclusions along with keeping children on parent’s policies until age 26 showed the world Republicans were caring and compassionate (or so they said).

But doing away with the individual mandate and dropping certain taxes has brought into focus the difficult task of how to pay for these benefits and keep the same number of Americans on the insured roles. The inescapable GOP conclusion is that insurance costs will not come down unless, Republicans say, the free market kicks in. If this mysterious free market does not bring down the cost of insurance, then individuals and Medicaid will see large increases in cost.

The most conservative Republicans, true believers in everyone should have access to the best healthcare they can afford, are now proposing to eliminate the 10 healthcare benefits mandated in Obamacare. Hmmm.

  1.  Outpatient care—the kind you get without being admitted to a hospital
  2. Trips to the emergency room
  3.  Treatment in the hospital for inpatient care
  4.  Care before and after your baby is born
  5.  Mental health and substance use disorder services: This includes behavioral health treatment, counseling, and psychotherapy
  6.  Your prescription drugs
  7.  Services and devices to help you recover if you are injured, or have a disability or chronic condition. This includes physical and occupational therapy, speech-language pathology, psychiatric rehabilitation, and more.
  8.  Your lab tests
  9.  Preventive services including counseling, screenings, and vaccines to keep you healthy and care for managing a chronic disease.
  10.  Pediatric services: This includes dental care and vision care for kids

It shouldn’t take a genius to realize that without some requirement like these 10, insurance companies can price policies high and steer customers to stripped down version such as  catastrophic coverage. Moderate Republicans, especially those representing poor or inner city districts, see a huge backlash coming in the next election if the ultra conservatives prevail.

Conservatives are quick to counter, “doesn’t everyone have the right to buy only as much insurance as they want? Why would a single young man want to pay for pre and post natal coverage if he is not married?”

That strikes right to the heart of the matter. Healthcare costs, are generated by hospitals, doctors, and drug companies and don’t change simply because of insurance changes. The number of pre- and post natal visits will be the same regardless of whether a young man chooses to carry broad coverage or just a stripped down policy. The implication, however, should not be lost, everyone else will pay more if the young man is allowed to buy stripped down policies. That is the definition of insurance.

Republicans are ringing their hands over this dilemma. Conservatives say they will vote against the American Health Care Act if the bill looks too similar to Obamacare and Moderates say without certain coverage and federal assistance (like tax credits and Medicaid) they will vote against it.

Congress members appear to be living in a make believe world. If somehow Congressional leaders along with President Trump can work out a compromise and pass the American Health Care Act, then just looking at the reduce insured numbers and the fewer services many Americans want (and need), Republicans will lose in 2018.

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Explore posts in the same categories: ACA, affordable care act, congress, Conservatives, Democratic Party, Donald Trump, Economics, GOP, health insurance companies, Healthcare, Politics, Republican Party, Uncategorized

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