Tax Reform On The High Wire

With a one page, 200-ish word handout, President Trump presented his outline for revamping the Federal Tax code, and in one fell swoop, jump starting US economic growth. The Trump Administration announced the largest tax cuts “in history” and with a straight face assured listeners that these cuts would pay for themselves by boosting current 2% annual growth to 3+%. Hmmm.

The supply side argument is that lower taxes puts money in Americans pockets and with the extra cash, Americans will spend more. More spending, in turn, stimulates industry which adds more capacity, employing more Americans. The increased employment then ignites another round of investment and job hiring. If nothing else, it is an exciting story.

Regrettably, supply side economics (George H W Bush called it VooDoo economics) has been tried before and has been discredited by most economists. Arguably if most Americans received a big positive hit from a tax cut, one might feel President Trump’s outline was worth a shot.  Unfortunately most of President Trump’s tax savings proposal would flow to the already wealthy.  Hmmm.

Progressive economists (Keynesian followers) would prefer outright government spending if the desired policy is to stimulate growth. In practice tax cuts have tended to find their way into the already wealthy’s pockets and not into business investment. Surprised?

The proposed tax cut is a shameless attempt to steal from the average person and give to the wealthy. Hillary Clinton had proposed somewhat the opposite when she proposed new taxes on the wealthiest of Americans. While it is fair to question why the very wealthiest should pay more in taxes (as oppose to everyone paying more), the Trump proposal, as outlined, could increase the taxes of average Americans living in States with high State taxes (which are deductible now on Federal returns). But more than anything, the Trump proposal promised the lower income Americans nothing, question marks to middle income, and a bountiful gift to the wealthiest. For what?

First quarter GDP growth numbers were announced this morning.  The 0.7% growth underlines the problem America’s economy is facing.  Consumers aren’t spending nor are they choosing to save instead.  The average American does not feel flush with money and is choosing to wait on discretionary purchases.  A small increase in most consumer’s discretionary income (via a tax cut) will likely have only a small impact compared to an equal sized increase in direct Government spending.

There is another and important part to the tax cut announcement. Trump Administration is proposing to lower the “corporate” tax rate from 35% to 15%. This is worth listening too. Why? The stated objective is to make our corporation globally competitive and in the process encourage (and not discourage as in now the case) American corporations to repatriate their overseas earnings. (One report estimated that there may be over 2 trillion dollars in overseas banks.) Corporations claim that the 35% tax on repatriated earnings is too onerous compared to their alternatives.

The reasoning goes that repatriated overseas earnings could be used to invest and stimulate the economy, and once taxed, provides the Government a means to increase spending without increasing the debt.

As with many well intended objectives, lowering the corporate tax rate across the board could bring handsome savings to many who do not compete with foreign companies or have hoarded money in far away places. Lawyers, doctors, and hedge funds, to name a few, could spin this lower rate and change their tax paying status for income taxed at 35% to the new lower !5% corporate rate. And why would that be a wise use of the tax code?

There is precious little known about the exact tax code reform but what is implied in the one page press release, the rationale (stimulating growth) for implementing this reform is highly doubtful.

What seems not doubtful is that the very wealthiest Americans will take home a bundle. Hmmm.

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Explore posts in the same categories: congress, Democratic Party, Donald Trump, economic growth, Economics, GOP, Republican Party, tax reform, taxes, Uncategorized

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