Healthcare, A New Take?

Former Oklahoma US Senator, Tom Coburn, gave a genuinely heartfelt argument on how to fix healthcare. Coburn’s solution  –  total free enterprise. Use the free market, Coburn said, where millions of Americans could seek “great quality” healthcare at the lowest prices. The former Senator used the Amish as an example of price shopping with the outcome – great coverage at low cost. Hmmm.

Tom Coburn is a doctor (MD) by education and should know something about healthcare. Senator Coburn is a conservative and has a history of concern over healthcare cost.  Senator Coburn, needless to say, was not a fan of the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare).

And to be sure, there are situations with our current healthcare delivery model ripe for abuse.  Fee for service, Medicare payment for unneeded services, and non-negotiated drug costs in Medicare Part D are a few examples.

Most Americans are largely divorced from healthcare’s actual cost. Most Americans are covered by group health plans (paid for by employers) or for those over 65, Medicare. While there are deductibles and co-pays, these costs are nominally small compared to the overal healthcare cost. Consequently most Americans are content with and expect their employer and their insurance provider to fight with doctors, hospitals, and drug companies and manage these healthcare services prices.

Do you think insurance companies, who have built into their policy prices their earning would welcome a lower premium cost which would in turn lower profits for their shareholders? Hmmm.

In addition to employer provided and Medicare, there are Medicaid (for those who qualify) and the single payer market to make up the rest. (I am excluding the VA system for reasons of simplicity.) It seems ridiculous to believe that Americans on Medicaid roles, who can not afford to buy their own healthcare policies now because they are too poor would suddenly be able to find their way through the medical and insurance maze and buy adequate healthcare insurance.

The individual market could be different however, since the members might have the financial means. But, does anyone think that suddenly insurance companies will welcome Americans with pre-existing conditions and charge them the same low rates as healthy young Americans? One might wonder what Senator Coburn has been smoking?

The free enterprise system, instead of being healthcare’s savior, is actually its devil. Our free enterprise, capitalist system honors the concept of maximizing profit. American healthcare costs have risen at two times the rate of inflation for years.  No better recent example is the American drug industry where prices have escalated at unprecedented rates. Disgracefully, one can buy in Canada the same US produced drug for substantially less. Hmmm.

Americans are regularly reminded about innovation and increased productivity from competition in a capitalist system. We are asked, “do you want to give that up”?

Americans, instead, need to ask a simpler question, “are there other healthcare delivery models around the world that cost less (say one half what the US spends) and are associated with better health outcomes”?

Senator Coburn’s proposition might work if all Americans had the same health prospectus and the same capabilities to make a deal. Buying an automobile or an airplane ticket are examples of where the free market is working. Americans pay widely different prices for essentially the same goods or services. Americans can, however, chose not own a car or use an airline to travel with no life or death consequences. Healthcare is different.

Over two dozen countries around the world have adopted healthcare delivery systems which cost half that which Americans spend and achieve better outcomes for all their citizens. Broadly speaking these healthcare delivery systems emphasize “prevention” and “ease of use”. These plans insure everyone (universal coverage) and employ a “single payer” administrative model. There are no “negotiations” between citizens and healthcare providers.  The role of doctors, hospitals, and drug companies are to serve the customer while earning a fair but modest profit.

Insurance companies may, if they wish, participate as a “plan administrator” facilitating payments for healthcare providers. Their profit is negotiated with the national healthcare agency (a government organization) so there is no temptation for insurance companies charge “what the market will bear”.

So in countries like Germany, basic healthcare is available to all residents at the same low co-pay cost (a national value added tax pays for most of a German’s healthcare cost). Socialism?

There is no effort or thought, however, that all Germans should be driving a BMW instead of a Volkswagen or  having no car at all.  What type of car a German buys and how much he/she pays for it is a free market event.   Germany has a capitalist economy but treats healthcare as an individual right.

Why is this such a foreign idea in Washington?  Why are Republicans so dead set about reducing healthcare in a land where healthcare costs are two or more times the level of other modern countries?

Are Republicans seeking the best healthcare delivery system money can buy?

Advertisements
Explore posts in the same categories: affordable care act, Donald Trump, GOP, health insurance companies, Healthcare, medicaid, medicare, obamacare, Republican Party, Uncategorized

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: