Healthcare Math

News reports quoting prominent Republicans say Republicans are worried, because the healthcare industry makes up about 1/3 of the entire US economy. Rash cuts might kill the golden “jobs creation” goose. Hmmm.

This is a mind boggling statement for Republicans to admit. The GOP ran in the last election on repeal and replace and previously during the Obama Administration tried to hinder the Affordable Care Act when ever and where ever they could. Now suddenly Republicans are waking up to the broader role healthcare plays?

Now for the math. Total healthcare spending in 2016 came in around $3.2 “trillion”. The US population was about 320 million. That means that on average, each American consumed about $10,000 of healthcare (per capita). In actuality, some Americans consumed little or none and others consumed a lot more.

So, a family of five (mom, dad, brother, sister, sister) represent, if they were average, $50,000 a year on healthcare costs. That would represent $4166 per month from this families budget. So even if the household head earned $15 per hour ($31,200 per year), this family can not buy health insurance.

Most people, especially young and healthy Americans do not consume $10,000 a year in healthcare costs. From an insurance company’s perspective, those who consume less help offset those who consume more. In a somewhat complicated process, insurance companies dial in rates (young and healthy pay less, older and sicker pay more) and there you have it, the American healthcare delivery system.

Let’s consider the pending Republican “repeal and replace” healthcare legislation. What math questions arise?

First and foremost, and unfortunately never asked publicly, is $10,000 spending per capita reasonable? Does the US possess a older or sicker population, or are Americans more prone to serious illness than other parts of the world?

In comparison with the rest of the world, especially other modern economies like the US, the US spends almost twice as much as other modern countries. There are no indicators other than over consumption and inefficiency to explain this difference.

So does the Republican plan tackle this spending issue? Regrettably no. One would assume that cutting Medicaid and individual subsidies is intended instead to simply reduce the number of people seeking healthcare coverage, not increasing the number. Since those without insurance seem to consume a lot of healthcare once enabled to get coverage, cutting Medicaid and individual subsidies would help to keep rates from rising too much.  I suppose this could be viewed darkly as a cost control mechanism.

 

Second, the Republican plan shifts the tax burden away from those who can most afford paying to those who can the least. Estimates show an approximate $200 million tax cut for the wealthy while at the same time making it more difficult for lower income Americans to afford healthcare coverage.  This is an unforced error.

 

Third, pre-existing condition bring a bazaar ingredient to healthcare. The Affordable Care Act required insurers to cover all Americans regardless of pre-existing conditions. Republicans have been all over the map with respect to whether pre-existing conditions would be covered, how long, and for how much.

Covering pre-existing conditions, but charging exorbitantly higher premiums is tantamount to not covering those conditions.

 

Fourth, cutting Medicaid enrollment which provides coverage for the sickest and least able to afford insurance is a prescription for increasing the uninsured rolls. Republicans spin this issue by saying States are better able to determine how to deal with the poor.

What?

The nation’s poor are US citizens who just happen to live in a particular State. Some richer States can afford (at the same tax burden) to provide benefits and other States can not. How can healthcare be viewed as a privilege owing to which State one happens to live in?

 

Fifth, value add of insurance companies? The Republican plan doubles down on the existing cadre of healthcare insurance companies. Each healthcare insurance company demands healthcare service providers (hospitals, doctors, and drug companies) to use specific reporting forms for pre-approval and payment. As a consequence, healthcare service providers have increased their operating costs significantly by necessarily adding “non-medical” staff to process paper work.

 

Sixth, fee for service is alive and well. The Republican proposals are silent on changing the basis for paying hospitals, doctors, and drug companies. Republicans claim that the “free market” will magically pit one insurer against another with the average American coming out the winner. This is a delusion.

Summary. There are gaps in the Affordable Care Act coverage (not everyone is covered) and there are anomalies in subsidies such that some Americans still can not afford to purchase subsidized insurance. And, the real healthcare cost drivers are not addressed sufficiently. There exists a pressing need to improve/reform Obamacare.

The Republican proposal does nothing to address Obamacare defects nor does it portend to deal with reigning in the obscene yearly cost increases. What a shame the country is being lead towards third world healthcare delivery standards (best healthcare money can buy) instead of rivaling the best of the best.

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Explore posts in the same categories: affordable care act, congress, Democratic Party, Donald Trump, GOP, health insurance companies, Healthcare, Politics, Republican Party, Uncategorized

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