Deeply Held Religious Freedom

Hmmm. The Supreme Court has agreed to hear on appeal a case where a cake maker refused to serve a gay couple who wished to purchase a decorated cake for their wedding.

The baker claimed that his deeply held religious views would be compromised because the bible and his religion instructed him not to recognize homosexuality. The Supreme Court will now weigh in on whether religious rights can justify discrimination.

When I think about religion, the first thought that comes to mind is, ”love your neighbor as yourself”. So it seems to me incomprehensible how a serious religion can say, “hold on a minute, the Bible did not mean all neighbors”.

Regrettably, too many religions find it useful to divide and conquer the masses. By assigning “good” to some and “bad” to others, religious leaders can more easily influence the congregation’s direction, and not to be overlooked, the congregation’s gift giving (to the religious leaders). So one might be justified to suspect to any claim of “deeply held” religious views.

If a black person went into any store and when they requested a service, they were told that store does not serve black people, would there be a question that his behavior was illegal? And the same can be said about a Christian denying service to a Jew, or a Jew denying service to a Muslim. So what is it about homosexuals who want to celebrate their marriage?

Mormons were once upon a time excited about having multiple wives. Federal law prohibits that practice and did that Federal law not go against deeply held religious views?

Jehovah Witnesses do not believe in blood transfusions. Yet courts have ordered blood transfusions when medically necessary to save a life viewing the refusal of a blood transfer to be scientifically unfounded and tantamount to committing suicide.

Arguments before the Supreme Court will not take place until the Court’s new term in October. Between now and then, the public could boycott this religious baker and help this religious person reap the benefits of his deeply held views.

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