When People Think Differently

The idea of “universal, single payer” healthcare seems so obvious as both the most efficient and least costly method of delivering a nation’s basic healthcare, it seems incredible that there are so many Americans who do not embrace this notion. Why would that be?

Fewer and fewer Americans remember the time before the wide spread availability of insurance company provided healthcare. Yet the US system of “for profit” healthcare insurers is a relatively recent happening. Following WWII, employers began offering health insurance as an employee benefit designed to retain employees in a period of relatively full employment. Health insurance as a benefit caught on and employers have found it difficult to retain workers without offering health insurance. Hmmm.

Also escaping most Americans knowledge is the cottage industry which is necessary to support the multitudes of healthcare insurers. Healthcare service providers (doctors, hospitals and drug companies for example) must carefully keep track of each patient and how much service that patient has consumers, report those services using each insurers different set of codes on each insurers specific form, and then argue with each of these insurers to insure they receive reimbursement for the services already provided. This entails millions of more healthcare workers who do not themselves provide healthcare. Hmmm.

More than two dozen other modern countries (like Germany, France, England, Japan, and Canada) utilize a single payer, universal healthcare service delivery system. These countries all offer “best in class” healthcare services at about one half the total cost experienced in the US. These countries also report excellent healthcare outcomes and boast longer life expectancies than the US. Oh, and these countries provide this healthcare to all residents. Hmmm.

So, why would anyone not be in favor of universal healthcare?

In the US there are many who decry the idea of universal healthcare. They predict unacceptably long wait times to see a doctor or receive treatments. They ask the question “if healthcare is so good in other countries, why do people from Canada travel to the US for medical care?”, and “Why should we put the government between you and your doctor?”, the ask.

The politics of healthcare is even more fascinating and not easy to understand. Progressives are for a universal system and conservatives are not. Conservatives point to Progressive’s record of entitlements and using taxes to fund the cost. Conservatives see creeping socialism behind the call for universal healthcare and the resulting dependency of Americans to look for government to solve all their problems. And worse, universal healthcare will bloat the government making what is already (in their opinion) too big, even bigger. And even worse, conservatives don’t want their tax dollars going to pay for healthcare for someone else. Hmmm.

Hmmm. What could be simpler. Big government, less choice, poorer quality, and offering out of control cost increases, conservatives claim.

Why do conservatives think that way when there are so many examples around the world that prove otherwise? Why don’t conservatives recognize that some Americans already have “universal healthcare”. These Americans, of course, are over 65 and are enrolled in Medicare.

Is this a subject of “the glass is half empty, or half full”? Do progressives and conservatives see the same problem (basic healthcare available to all Americans) or do they see different solutions to different problems (basic right versus small government with low taxes)?

If Americans see the same problem, conservatives may still view the delivery of basic healthcare too difficult a task for “American thinking” and from their perspective, a universal healthcare system must inevitably end up with poorer healthcare and higher costs. Progressives could, alternatively, see no problem too great for Government to solve and therefore discount totally conservatives’ warnings.

The recent Congressional fight over repeal and replace for Obamacare should make conservatives take notice. The conservative sponsored alternatives largely failed because they offered less coverage for the poor, those with pre-existing conditions, and the elderly.   Voters representing those groups made their views known. Progressives and conservatives would be wise to heed this warning.

Healthcare is not free and does require funding. Most other countries employ a “prevention” oriented healthcare philosophy, inhibitions towards uncontrolled price increases, and utilize a consumption tax (value added tax) to fund healthcare along with modest co-pay requirements.

Obamacare could be a starting point were Republicans to acknowledge that Obamacare was based upon Romneycare (Massachusetts) and that was based on a proposal from the conservative Heritage Foundation think tank.

If conservatives can’t agree with progressives on what the problem really is, voters make make the choice for them. The 2016 Presidential elections was a clear sign that the electorate was dissatisfied with both parties and threw its support to a total outsider.

What will voters do next time?

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Explore posts in the same categories: affordable care act, congress, Conservatives, Donald Trump, GOP, health insurance companies, Healthcare, medicaid, medicare, Politics, Republican Party, Uncategorized

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